Best enduro helmets 2021 | 5 convertible lids rated by our experts

I have had the chance to test five of the top-rated convertible lids, so I thought I’d put them head to head and find out which one is best. The lid is a crucial part of any dirt bike, and choosing the right one can be very difficult and frustrating. Today we’re going to find out which is the best one, so read on to find out which is the one you should buy.

The helmet industry is evolving as more people embrace the all-mountain and enduro disciplines. More and more manufacturers are releasing helmets that are designed for these activities, and more brands are now offering both traditional mountain bike-style helmets and the more aerodynamic designs that are becoming popular in enduro racing. This has led to a greater variety of helmets with multiple mounting options, so you can choose the helmet that is tailored to your riding needs.

As we all know, our heads are priceless and each and everyone of them have so many functions and responsibilities. One of the most important responsibility of the head is to protect it from the harsh effects of the environment. The best helmet can not only protect your head from injuries but also boost the performance of your bike.. Read more about best enduro full face helmet and let us know what you think.

Convertible mountain bike helmets combine the protection of a full-face helmet with the breathability of an open-face lid to give you the best of both worlds on the trail – it’s like having two helmets for the price of one.

While a full-face provides greater protection on the downhills, you wouldn’t want one on the uphills. So, ride up the hill in open-face mode first, then clip on the detachable chin bar to protect yourself when gravity takes control.

There will always be some degree of compromise with anything that is intended to be two things in one. Convertible enduro helmets are often a bit heavier in open-face form than normal trail helmets since they need additional structural components to properly convert to a full-face helmet.

Even while most convertible helmets (including all those tested here) satisfy the ASTM F-1952 DH racing safety standard when in their descending form, they don’t often feel as substantial or strong as a full-on downhill lid.

Finally, keep in mind that you must carry the chin bar while the helmet is not in full-face mode.

As always, we’ve taken all of these variables into account in order to make your purchasing choice a little simpler.

MIPS Bell Super DH

bell convertible helmet in full-face mode

It feels good on your head, and the full-face design makes venting a breeze. Andy Lloyd is a writer who lives in the United

It’s fantastic… Bell’s Super DH has hard, rather than soft, cushioning and feels like a full-on downhill full-face (though it’s not quite as substantial as the Giro Switchblade). It’s DH-certified and utilizes the newest MIPS Spherical brain-protection technology, unlike the brand’s cheaper Super 3R convertible lid. It feels good on your head, and the full-face design makes venting a breeze.

Despite being one of the largest on test, the chin bar is light and shallow enough to attach onto a pack without difficulty. It’s simple to attach it to the open-face lid, and the three locking clasps provide a reassuringly positive “snap” when correctly closed. Because it’s a bit tricky, it’s recommended removing the Super DH from your head to fit the chin bar. The Bell helmet has a head-hugging fit in open-face mode, with a brim that dips low over the ears and covers your temples.

We had no problems using it as an open-face lid on lengthy, sweaty rides since the retention cradle tightens evenly. While it isn’t the lightest helmet on the market, it feels solid and the weight is well distributed.

bell convertible helmet on open mode

The Bell helmet has a head-hugging fit in open-face mode. Andy Lloyd is a writer who lives in the United

This isn’t good… If you’re wearing gloves or have chilly hands, the thin strap may tangle quickly, making it difficult to line up the FidLock clasp. It also rests pretty near to your neck, so we’d like to see some more cushioning to make it even more comfortable.

MIPS Giro Switchblade

giro Switchblade MIPS convertible helmet in full-face mode

The size of the chin bar is one of the Switchblade’s major advantages. Immediate Media / Andy Lloyd

It’s fantastic… Of all the helmets here, this one feels the most like a normal full-face, and it’s also one of the most comfortable. The tight fit gives you confidence, and we had no trouble moving it about on very rocky terrain with the big adjustment dial cinched up. It offers the greatest head coverage in open-face mode, which, along with the MIPS liner, should keep your bonce safe.

We like the cushioned strap and double D-ring closing since it’s more secure and less fussy than other of the FidLock-equipped lids here, which have thin straps that twist easily. It also means that after it’s done up, it’s very comfortable (though a bit humid).

The size of the chin bar is one of the Switchblade’s major advantages. It’s by far the smallest on the list, which means it’ll be lot simpler to carry than some of the others, and it’ll fit inside a pack – something only a few others can claim.

It’s also easy to put together (and achievable while on your head), needing just precise alignment of the metal lugs before clicking it into place. More cushioning and a backup peak are welcome additions from Giro.

giro Switchblade MIPS convertible helmet in open mode

The quantity of covering, along with the MIPS liner, should keep your bonce well-protected in open-face mode. Immediate Media / Andy Lloyd

This isn’t good… Because to the open-face design, it’s not only the heaviest but also the sweatiest helmet in that mode. At extreme angles, the large adjustment wheel may be felt at the base of the neck, and we’d prefer a more positive click from the chin bar on engagement, according to several testers.

Mainline Smith

Smith Mainline full-face mountain biking helmet

Smith’s Mainline convertible full-face is one of our favorites. Immediate Media / Steve Behr

It’s fantastic… Smith’s Mainline is downhill approved and can be utilized in a variety of disciplines, making its premium price tag more attractive.

Inside, there’s a MIPS liner that’s supposed to help protect your head from angular hits. It comes in three different sizes, and three different size pad sets are included to guarantee a secure fit.

It’s a great option for trail riders and enduro racers seeking for a little additional protection.

The clasp is a D-ring, which takes a bit longer to secure than magnetic designs, but the cushioned strap makes it very comfortable.

The Mainline never seems claustrophobic while you’re breathing hard because to the open vents around the chin, and I didn’t bother removing it for the climbs on colder days.

This isn’t good… It’s a little heavy at 830g for a medium, but that doesn’t take away from the comfort.

MCR MET Parachute

met Parachute MCR convertible helmet in full-face mode

The chin bar is simple to install and remove. Andy Lloyd is a writer who lives in the United

It’s fantastic… With the original Parachute, MET was one of the first companies to release a convertible helmet, but the new MCR (Magnetic Chin bar Release mechanism) is a significant change from its prior lids.

Many will enjoy the addition of a MIPS lining and an easy-to-remove/replace chin bar, which is much chunkier and more substantial than the previous convertible version. In its open-face form, the parachute vents well, provides enough covering, and provides a well-tensioned and very comfortable fit due to the finely-indexed Boa dial that adjusts the retention cradle.

The chin bar is easy to install and remove; it’s one of the few parts of the helmet that can be removed or replaced without removing the whole helmet (just about). The Parachute feels sturdy, robust, and very comfortable as a full-face. While it isn’t the most comfortable, the ventilation is enough. The tall peak appeals to us since it is very flexible and therefore less likely to snap in transport.

MET Parachute MCR convertible helmet in open mode

The parachute ventilates effectively and provides enough covering in its open-face form. Andy Lloyd is a writer who lives in the United

This isn’t good… There’s no getting around the fact that you have to fully release the Boa dial before taking off or putting on the helmet. It’ll be a tight squeeze to get your head through the retaining cradle if you don’t do so.

Take into account

Arbitrator for Sweet Protection

Sweet Protection Arbitrator convertible helmet in full-face mode

The chin bar is attached to the helmet using lugs, locater tabs, and a clip that may be secured in place once in position. Andy Lloyd is a writer who lives in the United

It’s fantastic… With the Arbitrator, Sweet Protection hasn’t skimped on safety or protection. Its craftsmanship and sturdiness made it one of the most solid-feeling helmets we tested; in a blind test, you wouldn’t guess it had a changeable lid. The ratchet-style chin bar clasp is easier to remove and more comfortable than the Leatt, MET, and Bell helmets’ FidLock magnetic buckle. In open-face mode, there are separate straps that can be tucked away.

The chin bar is attached to the helmet using lugs, locater tabs, and a clip that may be secured in place once in position. The connecting clip is stiff at first, but once clamped in, it is sturdy. A MIPS liner is included in Sweet Protection to defend against rotating impacts. Even in the open-face arrangement, the venting across the brow is adequate, but it still becomes hot while you’re working hard.

Sweet Protection Arbitrator convertible helmet in open mode

In open-face mode, there are separate straps that can be tucked away. Andy Lloyd is a writer who lives in the United

This isn’t good… While the overall weight didn’t bother us in full-face mode, it’s noticeable without the chin bar. When tackling difficult trail sections, we discovered that we needed to crank up the retention cradle to keep it secure. The vertical adjustment on the retaining cradle may also move unintentionally.

When reattaching the chin bar, the hard locking clip at the back requires considerable thumb power to tighten at first, but Sweet Protection assures us that it becomes simpler with practice. The chin bar is the most difficult to transport after it has been removed.

The next-gen, race-proven Enduro helmet is the Bell, and it’s already on sale. After testing Bell’s new Enduro helmet in the saddle through the mud, rock, and fire of the World Enduro Championship, I think the Bell has officially taken over the enduro category. This is because Bell’s engineers took their time designing the best possible helmet for enduro, starting with a bang.. Read more about lightest full face mtb helmet 2020 and let us know what you think.

This article broadly covered the following related topics:

  • best enduro full face helmet
  • full face mtb helmet removable chin guard
  • mountain bike helmets
  • mtb helmets
  • mtb helmets full face
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