The HP Pavilion Aero 13 is a powerful and well-designed laptop that offers a good balance of performance and portability.

The hp x360 laptop is a review of the HP Pavilion Aero 13. It’s a 13-inch laptop that has an Intel Core i5 processor and 8GB RAM, as well as a 256GB SSD.

While we now cover laptops more broadly, it’s always a joy for me to test thin and lightweight ultrabooks once more. Ultrabookreview.com began many years ago as a result of my dislike for the chunky and heavy notebooks that were mostly available around 2010, and while we cover laptops more broadly these days, it’s always a joy for me to test thin and lightweight ultrabooks once more.

The 13-inch HP Pavilion Aero is a sub-one-kilogram (2.2-pound) laptop featuring a 13-inch 16:10 matte screen, uncompromised IO and interfaces, fast technology, and a very reasonable pricing. In fact, it was for all of these reasons that I purchased this laptop a few weeks ago, hoping to see how it compared to the more expensive ultraportables on the market and if it might be a suitable replacement for my travel companion, my now-very-old XPS 13.

Spoiler alert: this Pavilion Aero 13 is a very well-balanced ultrabook that only betrays its budget origins in a few places, like as the tiny battery and the absence of a few functions found on higher-tier versions. Let’s dig a little further down below.

HP Pavilion Aero 13 specs as reviewed

  HP Pavilion Aero 13
Screen LG Philips LGD06B9 panel, 13.3 inch, 16:10 format, 1920 x 1200 px, IPS, matte, non-touch, LG Philips LGD06B9 panel, LG Philips LGD06B9 panel, LG Philips LGD06B9 panel, LG Philips LGD06B9 panel, LG Philip
Processor 6C/8T AMD Cezanne Ryzen 5 5600U CPU
Video 7 EUs, 1.8 GHz AMD Vega
Memory DDR4-3200 16 GB (soldered)
Storage M.2 PCIe x4 SSD, 512 GB (Micron 2210)
Connectivity Bluetooth 5.0, Wireless 6 AX (Realtek RTL8852AE).
Ports 2x USB-A 3.2 gen1 ports, 1x USB-C gen2 port with data, DP, and charging, HDMI 1.4b port, and audio jack
Battery Charger with 43 Wh and 65 W barrel plug
Size 398 mm or 11.73” (w) x 209 mm or 8.23” (d) x 17 mm or 0.67” (h) 398 mm or 11.73” (w) x 209 mm or 8.23” (d) (h)
Weight Charger and cables, 2.1 pounds (.95 kg)+.69 lbs (.31 kg), EU version
Extras Fingerprint reader, white backlit keyboard, HD webcam, stereo speakers

Our test machine is probably the Pavilion Aero 13’s best value configuration, although higher-specked alternatives, including a Ryzen 7 5800U CPU and more storage, are also available.

Construction and design

Despite its little weight (less than 2.2 pounds or 1 kilogram), the Pavilion Aero seems solid and durable, and I anticipate it to last a long time.

The whole structure is made of aluminum, with thick sections that do not bend or creak in any manner. HP also chose a basic silver color and a slightly rougher texture for all of the surfaces, the type that resists smudges and scratches and provides a solid grip when the laptop is lifted up.

HP-Pavilion-Aero-13-review

At the same time, I have to say that this kind of aluminum seems a little less expensive than the finishes on the higher-end HP Spectre models. Plus, with that huge glossy HP logo on the lid and some HP, Pavilion, and B&O markups here and there, the design is simple and maybe a bit monotonous.

I appreciate how HP made this laptop with a 16:10 display, thin bezels, and a camera and microphones at the top. The hinges make it easy to lift up the screen and adjust it by yourself, but they’re a little flimsy and won’t hold the screen in place when you pick up the laptop and move it. The display, on the other hand, does not move or wobble while it is still. These hinges also restrict the lean-back angle to approximately 145 degrees, and I wish HP had included a screen that folds back flat to 180 degrees, which I really like on ultraportables.

Aside from that, I have a little gripe with the laptop’s thermal design. The screen raises the main body on tiny rubber feet at the bottom, similar to the Asus ZenBooks of this generation, and then hot air is forced out via a vent positioned between the hinges, beneath the screen, with some of it entering the panel. While not ideal, this isn’t a deal breaker for this laptop, as I’ll explain later in the Performance and Emissions section.

1633036542_926_HP-Pavilion-Aero-13-review

On the plus side, I appreciate how the large rubber feet on the bottom keep the laptop firmly fixed on a desk, how HP dulled and sloped down the front lip so it doesn’t bite into the wrists, and how this ultra-compact laptop doesn’t make any obvious ergonomic compromises.

It also has a good number of connections on the sides, including two USB-A ports, one USB-C port, a full-size HDMI port, and a headphone jack. The USB-C connector, which enables data, video, and charging, is located on the left side of the device. The laptop comes with a barrel-plug charger that plugs in on the right side, allowing you to use the USB-C port while it’s plugged in, but you can also charge it through USB-C with a compatible adapter.

HP had to place some flappy coverings over the USB-A ports as a result of the slimmer design, and they’re unpleasant in real life since you have to use both hands to properly enter anything into those slots. They annoyed me throughout my time with this laptop, but I still like this method, which allows for full-size connections despite the fact that many of this generation’s smallest designs are USB-C only.

1633036543_253_HP-Pavilion-Aero-13-review

Finally, you won’t find a card reader, an IR Hello camera, or up-firing speakers in this package. The drawbacks of this being a low-cost choice.

Trackpad and keyboard

HP has some of the best ultrabook keyboards, and this one is no exception, as long as you can get over the fact that they opted with silver keycaps, which make the lettering difficult to see with the white lighting turned on. As a result, I greatly like the black keyboards seen on HP EliteBook models.

1633036544_584_HP-Pavilion-Aero-13-review

Apart from that, there’s not much to complain about here. The lighting is adequate and consistent, with light only leaking out from under the top row of F-keys. HP also included a tactile Caps Lock indication and allowed sliding your fingers over the clickpad to activate the brightness, exactly as on premium smartphones.

I’m also pleased with the typing experience. Despite the fact that this is a little 13-inch laptop, HP included a full-size keyboard with enough spacing and feedback, as well as an additional column of keys on the right for Home/End/PgUp/PgDn. It took me a while to get accustomed to the half-sized up and down arrows flanked by full-size left and right arrows, but I can live with them now.

Because the clickpad is made of plastic, this Pavilion once again reveals its natural beauty. The surface is roomy and responsive, but it doesn’t feel as pleasant to the touch as rival laptops’ glass displays. Because it’s a firm and robust surface, it doesn’t squeak when you tap it, and the bottom corners have smooth and quiet clicks.

In terms of biometrics, there’s a finger-sensor with Hello support below the arrow keys on the right side of the armrest, but no IR camera.

Screen

Here in the United States, HP sells the Pavilion Aero 13 with a single screen option, a 13-inch 16:10 matte version without touch and a panel that is of average quality by today’s standards.

We tested a maximum brightness of 450+ nits, which implies you may use this computer comfortably in strong light if you wish to, as well as outstanding blacks and contrast for this class. Color coverage is 100 percent sRGB, making it ideal for everyday usage.

On the other side, at the absolute lowest brightness level, this drops to approximately 23 nits, which may not be dim enough for some of you in gloomy situations. The good news is that our unit showed very little mild bleeding.

With an X-Rite i1 Display Pro sensor, here’s what we got in our tests:

  • LG philips LGD06B9; LG philips LGD06B9; LG philips LGD06B9; LG philips LG
  • sRGB coverage is 98.8%, AdobeRGB is 69.4%, and DCI-P3 is 72.4 percent.
  • Gamma (measured): 2.03;
  • On power, the maximum brightness in the center of the screen is 454.59 cd/m2;
  • On power, the minimum brightness in the center of the screen is 23.35 cd/m2;
  • 1688:1 contrast at maximum brightness;
  • 6900 K is the white point.
  • 0.27 cd/m2 at maximum brightness;
  • PWM: No.

To correct the minor Gamma and White Point imbalances, calibration is needed. This reduces the maximum brightness somewhat, but the panel still comes out well balanced in terms of luminosity and color quality, with minor but acceptable DeltaE fluctuations in the corners. This implies you may use this screen for creative work on occasion, even though it isn’t optimal for such tasks.

In certain areas, a QHD+ 2560 x 1600 px panel, still IPS with 400+ nits of brightness and 100 percent sRGB colors, is also available for the Aero 13. It’s a cheap upgrade, costing about $30 in the US, but I wouldn’t recommend it on this model since it would certainly reduce battery life, which is already poor on the FHD+ screen option.

Performance and hardware

The HP Pavillion Aero 13 we tested had a mid-spec setup with an AMD Cezanne Ryzen 5 5600U CPU, 16 GB of DDR4 memory, and 512 GB of PCIe x4 SSD storage.

We’re using a retail version of this laptop that I purchased with my own money, not one supplied by HP or anybody else. We’re also putting the software and drivers that will be released in late September 2021 to the test (F1.02 BIOS, HP Support Assitant 8.8.34.31 software).

In terms of specifications, this is based on an AMD Ryzen Cezanne platform, featuring a Ryzen 5 5600U CPU in our setup. This CPU is a 6C/12T, but it’s based on the Zen3 Cezanne architecture, giving it a boost in IPC and performance over the Ryzen 5 5500U.

There are other 8C/16T Ryzen 7 5800U variants available, however as you’ll see in the table below, HP only used a 15W sustained power profile in this laptop. That’s a bit of a restriction for the Ryzen 5 5600U, but much more so for the 5800U, particularly under combination intensive loads when the power limit impacts both the CPU and the iGPU frequencies. In a moment, we’ll go further.

In certain instances, the CPUs are additionally coupled with DDR4-3200 MHz memory rather than the newer and more efficient LPDDR4x, which reduces speed and efficiency. Because the RAM is onboard and not upgradeable, I selected a configuration with 16 GB of memory. The memory is the newer SR kind, and the ZenTimmings printscreen above shows the timings.

Finally, an M.2 2280 slot is available for storage, and this unit came with a 512 GB Micron 2210 SSD, a middling performer that’s fine for everyday use but not ideal for intensive transfers, as it chokes once it gets hotter than 60 degrees, despite the drive having an aluminum heatsink over it, which is unusual in this class of ultrabooks. If you wish, you may replace the default disk with a higher-capacity and better-quality SSD.

The SSD and WiFi chip are the only components that may be upgraded. To get to them, you’ll need to peel off the rubber feet, as demonstrated in the video below, since the screws that hold the bottom panel in place are hidden under these feet. So be cautious not to tear or dirty the glue so that you can correctly reinstall the feet and avoid them coming off on their own later.

This isn’t great, and I wouldn’t recommend opening this laptop until absolutely necessary.

In terms of software, I installed a fresh copy of Windows on my machine, so I can’t comment on what software comes preloaded on devices that come with Windows by default. I installed the HP Support Assistant to assist with updates, but it’s not necessary. I’m not sure whether there’s any control software that lets me play about with battery settings, power profiles, audio profiles, and so on. This is my first HP laptop in a long time, so maybe you can assist me?

As a result, throughout my time with this laptop, I only fiddled with the Windows power settings, choosing for the Better Battery profile for everyday usage and Best Performance for benchmarks and gaming. Here’s what to anticipate in terms of performance and internal temperatures while using the laptop on a regular basis, when it remains totally quiet and runs cool to the touch.

So, on to the difficult tasks: we begin by evaluating the CPU’s performance by running the Cinebench R15 benchmark in the Best Performance Windows setting for 15+ times in a loop, with a 2-3 second wait between each run.

For a short while, the Ryzen 5 5600U processor in this laptop runs at 25+W, but then lowers to 15W and stays there, with quiet fans (37-38 dB) and CPU temps in the mid-80s. As a result, you’ll get around 1050 points.

I haven’t tried the lower power settings, but I did test it disconnected from the wall and it worked just as well as when it was put in. The graphs below show all of these results in detail.

1633036545_702_HP-Pavilion-Aero-13-review

To put these results in context, consider how this 15W Ryzen 5 5600U compares to 15W Ryzen 5 5500 (6Core), Ryzen 7 5700U, and Ryzen 5 800 (8Core) implementations, as well as a 15W Intel-based i7-1165G7 system (4Core). For a comparison of what the platform is capable of in a more liberal design, I’ve included a higher-power version of the Ryzen 7 5700U.

Based on these findings, a Ryzen 7 5800U Aero 13 setup would score about 1300 points on this test, approximately 20% more than the Ryzen 5 5600U version. In a higher-power laptop with a more competent thermal design, the same Ryzen 7 5800U CPU might earn 1500-1600 points.

1633036546_503_HP-Pavilion-Aero-13-review

In the 3Dmark CPU test, I also put the Ryzen 5 5600U CPU to the test.

1633036547_263_HP-Pavilion-Aero-13-review

We then double-checked our results by performing the lengthier and more difficult Cinebench R23 and Prime95 tests, both of which produced about 15W of continuous CPU power.

Finally, the 3DMark stress test repeats the same test 20 times in a loop, looking for performance fluctuation and deterioration over time under combined CPU+GPU loads, and this laptop breezed through it. This points to a well-balanced thermal profile with minimal performance losses as the temperature rises.

Overall, these are the numbers I’d anticipate from a Ryzen hardware implementation restricted to 15W. Furthermore, the system only enables the CPU to operate at greater power for a limited period of time, which is why the 3DMark stress test revealed no performance differences. The power restriction has an impact on CPU and GPU performance, with this implementation scoring about 80% to 90% of what the Ryzen 5 5600U platform would achieve in an ideal non-power-limited implementation. However, with this kind of ultra-compact chassis with a basic thermal design, that shouldn’t come as a surprise.

Here are some benchmark results to follow. On this Ryzen 5 5600U setup, we conducted the full battery of tests and benchmarks using the Best Performance Windows profile. Here’s what we came up with.

  • 3DMark 13 – Fire Strike: 2908 (Graphics: 3153, Physics: 15488, Combined: 1039); 3DMark 13 – Fire Strike: 2908 (Graphics: 3153, Physics: 15488, Combined: 1039); 3DMark 13 – Fire Strike: 2908 (
  • 3DMark 13 – Nigh Raid: 12305 (Graphics – 13756, CPU – 7703); 3DMark 13 – Nigh Raid: 12305 (Graphics – 13756, CPU – 7703);
  • 3DMark 13 – Time Spy: 1133 (Graphics – 999, CPU – 4777); 3DMark 13 – Time Spy: 1133 (Graphics – 999, CPU – 4777); 3DMark 13 – Time
  • 1080p Uniengine Superposition 1821 (medium);
  • Uniengine Superposition – 1080p Extreme: 574; Uniengine Superposition – 1080p
  • Handbrake 1.3.3 (4K to 1080p encode): average frame rate of 28.68 frames per second;
  • PassMark10: 4507 (CPU: 13826, 3D Graphics: 2181, Disk: 13058); PassMark10: 4507 (CPU: 13826, 3D Graphics: 2181, Disk: 13058); PassMark10: 4507 (CPU:
  • 5177 (E – 8736, P – 8791, DCC – 4903); PCMark 10: 5177 (E – 8736, P – 8791, DCC – 4903);
  • 64-bit GeekBench 5.3.1: 1299 single-core processors, 4861 multi-core processors
  • CPU 1260 cb, CPU Single Core 217 cb in CineBench R15 (best run);
  • CPU 2918 cb, CPU Single Core 522 cb in CineBench R20 (best run);
  • CPU 6390 cb, CPU Single Core 1326 cb in CineBench R23 (best run);
  • 64-bit x265 HD Benchmark: 54.11 fps;
  • BMW Car Scene in Blender 2.90 – CPU 6m 42s to calculate;
  • Blender 2.90 – CPU – Classroom scene Calculation time: 17 minutes and 5 seconds.

Fair results for this 15W Ryzen 5 5600U implementation once again.

I’ll also mention that we measured the same level of performance whether the laptop was powered by USB-C or was operating on battery power. This final feature is uncommon in ultraportables, although it is partly offset by the Pavilion Aero 13’s tiny battery.

With that out of the way, we tested a few DX11, DX12, and Vulkan games on the Best Performance profile, FHD and FHD+ (native) resolution, and Low/Lowest graphics settings, as well as a few other recently tested comparable platforms. Here’s what we came up with:

Vega 7 + Ryzen 5 5600U Pavilion Aero 13, FHD+ 1200p, Ryzen 5 5600U 15W Pavilion Aero 13, FHD 1080p, Ryzen 5 5600U 15W FHD 1080p ZenBook 13 UM325, Ryzen 7 5800U 15W FHD 1080p IdeaPad Flex 5, Ryzen 7 5700U 24W FHD 1080p ZenBook 13 UM325, Ryzen 5 5500U 15W Core i7-1165G7 19W, FHD 1080p, ZenBook 14 UX425.
Infinite Bioshock (DX 11, Low Preset) 66 frames per second (48 frames per second – 1% low) 71 frames per second (51 frames per second – 1% low) 78 frames per second (54 frames per second – 1% low) 75 frames per second (56 frames per second – 1% low) 70 frames per second (52 frames per second – 1% low) 70 frames per second (40 frames per second – 1% low)
Dota 2 is a game developed by Valve Corporation (DX 11, Best Looking Preset) 46 frames per second (33 frames per second – 1% low) 49 frames per second (34 frames per second – 1% low) 54 frames per second (32 frames per second – 1% low) 53 frames per second (41 frames per second – 1% low) 49 frames per second (33 frames per second – 1% low) 56 frames per second (44 frames per second – 1% low)
Far Cry 5 is the fifth installment in the Far Cry series (DX 11, Low Preset, no AA) 21 frames per second (18 frames per second – 1% low) 23 frames per second (19 frames per second – 1% low) 26 frames per second (22 frames per second – 1% low) 24 frames per second (21 frames per second – 1% low) 23 frames per second (18 frames per second – 1% low) 26 frames per second (18 frames per second – 1% low)
Shadow of Mordor is a film set in Middle Earth (DX 11, Lowest Preset) 43 frames per second (28 frames per second – 1% low) 46 frames per second (30 frames per second – 1% low) 51 frames per second (34 frames per second – 1% low) 47 frames per second (38 frames per second – 1% low) 48 frames per second (38 frames per second – 1% low) 65 frames per second (47 frames per second – 1% low)
NFS: Most Wanted is a video game developed by NFS (DX 11, Lowest Preset) 60 frames per second (53 frames per second – 1% low) 60 frames per second (54 frames per second – 1% low) 60 frames per second (56 frames per second – 1% low) 60 frames per second (52 frames per second – 1% low) 60 frames per second (49 frames per second – 1% low) 60 frames per second (46 frames per second – 1% low)
Tomb Raider: Shadow of the Tomb Raider (DX12, Lowest Preset, no AA) 28 frames per second (22 frames per second – 1% low) 30 frames per second (25 frames per second – 1% low) 33 frames per second (18 frames per second – 1% low) 28 frames per second (22 frames per second – 1% low) 26 frames per second (15 frames per second – 1% low) 28 frames per second (16 frames per second – 1% low)
Strange Brigade is a band of misfits who (Vulkan, Low Preset) 33 frames per second (27 frames per second – 1% low) 35 frames per second (30 frames per second – 1% low) 39 frames per second (33 frames per second – 1% low) 36 frames per second (31 frames per second – 1% low) 36 frames per second (31 frames per second – 1% low) 44 frames per second (28 frames per second – 1% low)
The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt is the third installment in The Witcher franchise (DX 11, Low Preset, Hairworks Off) 22 frames per second (16 frames per second – 1% low) 24 frames per second (17 frames per second – 1% low) 21 frames per second (17 frames per second – 1% low) 24 frames per second (18 frames per second – 1% low) 22 frames per second (12 frames per second – 1% low)
  • Dota 2, NFS, and Witcher 3 — recorded in game mode with MSI Afterburner;
  • Games like Bioshock, Far Cry 5, Middle Earth, Strange Brigade, and Tomb Raider were recorded using the Benchmark tools that came with the game.

In earlier games, we’re looking at 60+ frames per second, while in more demanding AAA games released in recent years, we’re looking at 20-30 frames per second. The CPU/GPU clocks and temps in a few games are shown in the performance logs below, and you can see how the system rapidly lowers below 15W and how ambient temperatures have a little effect on the clock rates. For comparison, I tested at 22°C and 26°C ambient temperatures.

Furthermore, gaming on the laptop’s battery produces the same effects as when it is connected in.

HP-Pavilion-Aero-13-review

Based on my results, I believe that this Ryzen 5 version of the HP Pavilion Aero 13 offers the greatest bang for your money.

Due to the increase in Cores/Threads, the Ryzen 7 5800U combination would result in a 10-20% boost in performance under CPU-heavy loads, but don’t expect it to operate at full capacity in this 15W restricted design. Because of the same power restriction that prevents the Vega 8 GPU in the 5800U from running at maximum speeds under prolonged loads, don’t anticipate substantial changes in GPU-demanding workloads.

Noise, heat, connectivity, speakers, and other factors are all factors to consider.

HP chose a simple thermal module with a single heatpipe and single fan, similar to what we’ve seen on other mid-tier ultrabooks.

1633036549_25_HP-Pavilion-Aero-13-review

Aside from that, the system prioritizes low fan noise and restricts hardware power under prolonged loads, although the end effect is a nice balance of noise and temperature. When the laptop is plugged in and set to Best Performance, the fan is largely off and only comes on when light multitasking is being done. Coil whine or electrical sounds are not audible at ear level, but when I placed my ear over the keyboard, I could detect a faint hum.

The fan rises to 37-38 dB at head-level during games and heavy loads, with reasonable internal and exterior temperatures. The hot air is forced into the screen due to the internal system’s design, but the plastic hinge and bottom bezel absorb the most of the heat, and the panel itself only heats up to the low to mid-30s, which is completely safe over time.

The warmest area of the laptop is around the WASD keys, but even that is up to 40 degrees Celsius, which is far lower than on most other ultraportable designs and not enough to cause discomfort in real usage.

1633036551_847_HP-Pavilion-Aero-13-review

*Daily Use – 30 minutes of Netflix in EDGE, Better Battery Mode, and fans set to 0-35 dB *Gaming – 30 minutes of Far Cry 5, Best Performance Mode, fans at 37-38 dB

This laptop has the latest-generation WiFi 6 and Bluetooth 5, but it uses a cheap RealTek 12 chip, so the connection isn’t as fast as it is on other contemporary computers. However, I found it to be enough for everyday usage, both near the router and at a distance of 30+ feet with obstructions in the way. If this isn’t fast enough for you, you may always replace the wifi module with a faster one.

A pair of stereo speakers that fire via grills on the bottom handle the audio. The D-slanted Panel’s design enables music to bounce off the table without distortion, and I haven’t experienced any arm-rest vibrations at higher levels. However, in our testing, we only recorded typical maximum levels of about 73-75 dB at head-level, and the audio quality isn’t great, with nothing on the bottom end.

The HD camera at the top of the screen isn’t very good, but it’s acceptable in bright light and has a broader angle than other ultraportables. The mics are also OK; they’re not great, but they’re not terrible either.

Life of the battery

This HP pavilion Aero 13 has a 43 Wh battery, which is much less than what you’d get in a 13-inch laptop these days. The efficient display and AMD Ryzen chip implementation help to offset the lower capacity to some extent, but you won’t be breaking any battery life records with this laptop.

Here’s what the screen looked like with the brightness adjusted to about 120 nits (60 brightness).

  • 7 W (6 h of usage) – Google Drive text editing, Standard + Better Battery Mode, screen at 60%, Wi-Fi ON;
  • 5.5 W (8+ hours of usage) — 1080p fullscreen movie in Edge, Standard + Better Battery Mode, screen at 60%, Wi-Fi ON;
  • Netflix fullscreen in Edge, Standard + Better Battery Mode, screen at 60%, Wi-Fi ON; 5 W (8+ h of usage) – Netflix fullscreen in Edge, Standard + Better Battery Mode, screen at 60%, Wi-Fi ON;
  • 9 W (3-5 hours of usage) – Edge, Standard + Better Performance Mode, screen at 60%, Wi-Fi turned on.

The laptop comes with a small 65W charger that connects to the laptop through a conventional barrel-plug connection, and USB-C charging is also available. The supplied charger is a two-piece design with a little brick but lengthy wires that add up to a lot of weight. With fast charging for the first half, a full charge takes less than 2 hours.

1633036552_865_HP-Pavilion-Aero-13-review

HP Pavilion Aero 13 price and availability

For approximately 700 EUR, I purchased this Ryzen 5 5600U version of the HP Pavilion Aero 13 with 16 GB of RAM and 512 GB of storage, which is a great deal for this setup.

The Ryzen 5 with 8GB RAM/256 GB SSD variant is also available, with prices beginning at about 650 EUR, while the Ryzen 7 5800U model begins at around 900 EUR.

The Aero 13 begins at $750 MSRP in the United States right now, although with periodic reductions, it may be had for around $700. At this time, the MSRP for the setup we have here is $850.

More information on this laptop may be found on HP’s website, or you can use this link to get the most up-to-date pricing and configurations in your area.

HP Pavilion Aero 13 final thoughts

This Aero 13 does nearly everything right and is one of the best-balanced mid-tier ultrabooks you can purchase right now for about 700 USD/EUR. Hopefully, you will be able to do so, since this item seems to be in great demand and limited supply in certain locations.

What you get is a well-built, sub-1-kilogram 13-inch laptop with excellent inputs, uncompromised IO, and a beautiful matte-screen, as well as a well-balanced hardware implementation for everyday use and occasional light-work and gaming. I suggest this Ryzen 5 5600U configuration with 16 GB of RAM, since there’s no need to spend more for the Ryzen 7 5800U in this chassis, and the 8 GB variants may not be enough for multitasking.

On the other hand, this laptop nevertheless demonstrates its low-cost character in a few places. It doesn’t feel as luxurious as an Envy 13, XPS 13, or even a ZenBook 13, and it lacks touchscreens and higher-resolution displays. It also lacks the greatest audio, an IR camera, and a glass touchpad, and it’s slower than bigger AMD Ryzen hardware implementations. However, I can live with all of them.

In fact, HP’s choice of a tiny battery that offers me 3-6 hours of practical daily usage on a charge may be the only true possible deal-breaker here. Personally, I’d like a somewhat heavier chassis with a 50-60 Wh battery, but that isn’t the case here. So I’m not sure whether I’ll retain this at this point. I still believe this is a very good-value choice in its class, but I’m not sure that this level of battery life is enough for me, mostly since this laptop would only be used on rare occasions when a lengthy battery life is required.

Nonetheless, this concludes my HP Pavilion Aero 13 review, and I’d love to hear your views and suggestions in the area below.

1633036553_166_HP-Pavilion-Aero-13-review

Disclaimer: Our material is entirely funded by our readers. We may get an affiliate commission if you purchase anything after clicking on one of our links. Find out more.

Editor-in-Chief of Ultrabookreview.com, Andrei Girbea. I’ve been writing about mobile computers since the early 2000s, and you’ll mainly find my reviews and comprehensive instructions on this site.

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  • hp pavilion gaming laptop
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